9 Replies Latest reply: Jun 14, 2013 9:33 AM by paul.wolf RSS

SnapMirror to DR moving from 1GbE to 10GbE

izzi
Currently Being Moderated

What in your opinion are the trade-offs with going from a 1g to 10g snapmirror network?

 

How much impact to you see latency and packet loss on this decision process? 

 

Is this worth the expense of the connection?

  • Re: SnapMirror to DR moving from 1GbE to 10GbE
    lmunro.hug
    Currently Being Moderated

    Hi,

     

    Do you know how much disk throughput you are currently doing to service actual workloads running on the SRC filer? I found even with good 1GbE layer 2 connections between SRC and DST there was a performance impact that was noticeable when snapmirrors occurred. This was on mid level 32xx systems doing snapmirror transfers totalling +-110MB/sec and user requests for data going between 300MB/sec and 400MB/sec, I always viewed snapmirrors as using disk throughput that could be servicing user requests. Even though the system tasks should have less priority over user data requests I didn't find this to be the case. You could try tweaking the priority but I found this didn't help much.

     

    If you had to have 10GbE for snapmirror traffic it would be my opinion that you may have to limit the speed to prevent performance impacts. Also is the destination systems disk throughput able to keep up (if it is a smaller system)

     

    This is my 2c

    Luke

  • SnapMirror to DR moving from 1GbE to 10GbE
    justin.smith
    Currently Being Moderated

    Curious what would throttling the bandwidth accomplish though?

     

    If  we ran fine on a 1GB interface, why would increasing the pipe 10x  between the 2 cause poor performance? And how would throttling the BW  help?

    • Re: SnapMirror to DR moving from 1GbE to 10GbE
      bbjholcomb
      Currently Being Moderated

      What is the MTU size on the 10G interface on the NetApp side? Do you have a firewall between the DC and how much bandwidth can it handle? We found a problem with jumbo frames on one end, it caused 100% CPU on the switch, changing from 9000 to 1500 packets. Most people use throttling when they have limited bandwidth between the DC, it doesn't seem to apply in your case.

    • Re: SnapMirror to DR moving from 1GbE to 10GbE
      radek.kubka
      Currently Being Moderated

      If  we ran fine on a 1GB interface, why would increasing the pipe 10x  between the 2 cause poor performance? And how would throttling the BW  help?

      I was thinking that SnapMirror traffic was going over using more than 1Gbit bandwidth, hence more reads from disks, hence lower performance of the system. It is moot point, indeed, if SM throughput stays below 1Gbit in both cases.

  • SnapMirror to DR moving from 1GbE to 10GbE
    justin.smith
    Currently Being Moderated

    The NetApp is configured for 1500. Ill triple check the switch, but I want to say its the same.

     

    Its probably just a setting on one side or a switch that doesnt match up....

    • Re: SnapMirror to DR moving from 1GbE to 10GbE
      bbjholcomb
      Currently Being Moderated

      As long as the switch is set to higher than 1500 the switch shouldn't be part of the problem. I would do a traceroute from end to the other and see what there is between there, can all of connection points handle 10g, you could over loading the firewall if it has a 1G connection. I would also run a packet trace on both ends, make sure you are seeing packets of 1500. Is the connection encrypted? We found problems with the packet size of 1500 for VPN, we set it lower. We have two 10G connections from coast to cost, we are able advantage of the 10G.  Just my opinion,  it appears something is being overloaded when you went from 1G to 10G.

  • Re: SnapMirror to DR moving from 1GbE to 10GbE
    paul.wolf
    Currently Being Moderated

    This brings Long Fat Networks (LFNs) into play as bandwidth gets wider, the ability to effectively utilize that bandwidth becomes more of a challenge. Not sure if this is the case here but in the last when we have gone to wide low latency links between sites, we would see the same or slightly worse overall performance between hosts. This was due to the nature of TCP specifically window size, acknowledgements and other TCP overhead.

     

    Here are some links that discuss LFNs

     

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bandwidth-delay_product

    http://itperformancemanagement.blogspot.com/2010/04/tcp-throughput-over-long-fat-networks.html

    http://technopragmatica.blogspot.com/2012/09/long-fat-networks.html

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...